Artist Maifesto

MA Artist Manifesto

It’s daunting taking on new studies but I have made the bold move to study an MA in Communication Design in September at NUA. Even though the course hasn’t started yet I have been given a preparatory assignment to create a manifesto to discuss in our first meeting. I would like to continue exploring history…

 

Tarot Card Design

As an artist it’s always good to try out new things and keep your portfolio fresh with new work. So Make Art That Sells’ 5 month Bootcamp is ideal for ticking all the artists boxes.

Empress Tarot Design

Empress Tarot Design

May’s brief was to create a Tarot Card Design. Before we knew the brief we were asked to explore medieval art and signs and symbols. Here’s a few sketches before the main brief.

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A World of Tales exhibition-Norwich

An Eternal Dream

An Eternal Dream

Here’s a press release that was sent out last month about my solo art exhibition:

Playful and theatrical artist and illustrator Tracy Satchwill will be exhibiting her first solo exhibition in Norwich at the Anteros Art Foundation. Inspired by history and narratives A World of Tales exhibition will showcase Satchwill’s vast collections of work including a new series inspired by ancient fairy tales. Renowned Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty and Rapunzel will rub shoulders with mermaids, kings and queens, a famous crime writer and an unpopular French queen. Satchwill’s Arts Council awarded project Magna Carta Women will also be on show for the first time in Norwich. The collage comprises of four panels in the narrative style of the traditional stained glass windows and is of notable people who have made a significant contribution to the furtherment of women’s rights and freedoms over the last 800 years. The project toured England last year, coinciding with the Magna Carta 800th anniversary celebrations.

The Iceni Queen

The Iceni Queen

Combining original photography with illustration, print and found objects, Satchwill’s artwork highlights her interest in the study of social history within a contemporary context. Her costumes, props and scenes are digitally created piece-by-piece, giving a unique process to her colourful work. She is also interested in theatre and a majority of her models are amateur actors.

The Secret Ball

The Secret Ball

Satchwill’s work has been featured in various exhibitions across the UK, Europe and America. In 2010 after completing her degree in illustration she was invited by The Courtaulds Institute of Art to join Exhibitionism: The Art of Display exhibition at Somerset House. Her Agatha Christie collection has received a wide response, touring America including the Empire State Building in New York and the famous Art Deco Hotel at Burgh Island, Devon. She was also invited to exhibit at Young Masters exhibition at Sphinx Fine Art Gallery, which features artist whose work is inspired by old masters. Her work has been shown at the Science MuseumOld Truman Brewery, Orleans House Gallery and recently the prestigious Guildhall Art Gallery in the City of London.

Satchwill recently illustrated the front cover of the Women’s Institute magazine, which celebrated their centenary. In 2012 she illustrated and co-published a mermaid book
A Mermaid’s Melody. Her work has also been showcased in publications including Aesthetica Creative Works and AOI Images 35.

Magna Carta Women

Magna Carta Women

A World of Tales exhibition runs from 24 May to 4 June and there will be a private view on Thursday 26 May with a chance to talk to the artist, take a photo of yourself as Emily Pankhurst or Catherine of Aragon and watch videos of the artist’s process. Plus there will be a short artist talk and a chance to take home a souvenir.

Christmas Decoration – MATS Course

Christmas Wreath2

 

As an artist it’s always good to try out new things and keep your portfolio fresh with new work. So Make Art That Sells’ 5 month bootcamp is ideal to tick all the artists boxes.

April’s brief was to create a Christmas ornament/decoration design based on lumberjacks, forest and anything else related to the subject.  It was a tough start with a few sketches of the subject before we got the main brief.

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Boudicia process 1

Queen Boudicia joins CLEY 16

I am excited to start a new project for the year.

I was pleased to be selected for CLEY 16 by guest curator Hugh Pilkington. The contemporary exhibition is an annual event and artworks are exhibited across the town of Cley next the sea including works on the beach and church. There isn’t a theme but the title will be In Norfolk Now.

As I am new to the area I thought it would be appropriate to create something about Norfolk and after all the mind mapping I came back to my favourites: history and women.

I was particularly interested in Queen Boudicia and the Iceni tribe from the Celtic era and would like to explore this further. There’s a start to the project.

Boudicia process 1

Boudicia process

I am particularly interested in the celtic patterns and artwork and would also like to display in an oval shape.

cernunos1

We meet up in February so I am sure things will change!

IMG_1114

 

Celebrating 100 years of Jam and Jerusalem

I am so pleased and honoured to have been asked to create the cover of WI magazine which celebrates their centenary this year. The cover includes lots of signs and symbols that represent the 100 years
including the Canadian flag, their welsh origins, link to the Queen, and some of the campaigns that the women have been involved in over the years such as Keep Britain Tidy, Fairtrade, breast cancer, AIDS, organ donor, equal pay,  village schools and of course votes for women. The two women in the foreground represent the women from 1915 and 2015. Of course I couldn’t  forget to add the jam and jerusaleum!

WI Life magazine

WI Life magazine

 

Here’s what I got up to before the final illustration.

Original concept

Original concept

mid process

mid process

tablecloth

tablecloth

Magna Carta Women from late 19th century part 1

Here are some more remarkable women who star in the Magna Carta Women collage to commemorate 800 years of democracy and illustrate the history of women’s rights.

It has been difficult deciding who makes it to the list. So far we have looked at some of the key women from the medieval times, 16th, 17th, 18th and early 19th century including Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, the ladies of Llangollen and Mary Astell. This time we look at some of the women who have made some giant steps towards women’s rights.

Ada Nield Chew

Ada was an influential figure for working class women. She joined the Independent Labour Party and National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies. She was aware of the differences in education and upbringing between middle class and working class women.

Ada Nield Chew

Ada Nield Chew

However she fought against this, speaking out about injustices and refused to be silenced by the better educated. This was reflected in the lively correspondence with Christabel Pankhurst in the magazine The Clarion during 1914. Ada argued that the WSPU policy was for “the entire class of wealthy women be(ing) enfranchised, (while) the great body of working women, married or single would be voteless still, and that to give wealthy women a vote would mean that they (would) vot(e) naturally in their own interests…”

She was also an active member of the Fabian Women’s Group and wrote for various journals including The Common Cause, The Freewoman and The Englishwoman’s Review.

Edith Lanchester

Marriage in the 19th century was thought to protect women, give them increased respectability, social standing and security however many more women were aware of the constraints of marriage. The alternative was to cohabit or live with a man out of wedlock, which was considered to be extremely sinful.

Edith Lanchester

Edith Lanchester

Edith Lanchester was a socialist and feminist from a prosperous family. She caused a storm by telling her family that, owing to the anti-woman marriage laws, she was going to cohabit with her lover James Sullivan. Her argument was the wife’s vow to obey the husband was oppressive and she didn’t want to lose her independence.

Her family tried to dissuade her but she would not marry. Her outraged father had her forcibly examined by a doctor who was mental specialist. After signing emergency commitment papers under the 1890 Lunacy Act, the doctor had Edith imprisoned. Her brothers and father, who bound her arms and legs with rope, forced her into a carriage sending her to a lunatic asylum. The psychiatrist said that the step she was going to take meant utter ruin, that she was committing social suicide and was unfit to take care of herself.

After four days of lobbying to get her released, with the help of her local MP, she was proclaimed sane though foolish. In the aftermath the case was discussed with strong views for and against. Even the Marquess of Queensbury offered Edith £50 if only she would get married, but she refused and happily cohabited with Sullivan for fifty years.

Emily Wilding Davison 1872-1913

This lady has links to Royal Holloway University of London and of course after receiving funding towards the Magna Carta Women project, I had to ensure she was included in the collage!

Emily Davison

Emily Davison

Emily studied at the university as well as Oxford University but because she was a woman she wasn’t allowed to take a degree. She joined the Women’s Social and Political Union and became a militant suffragette.

Once she hid in a cupboard in the chapel of the Palace of Westminster on the night of the 1911 census so that it was noted that her place of residence that night was the House of Commons. She was also arrested for various violent acts and spent a number of short periods in jail as well as going on hunger strikes. She objected to being forced-fed by throwing herself down a 10-metre iron staircase but luckily survived. Unfortunately she died the following year when she ran out in front of the king’s horse at Epsom Derby and died a few days later from her injuries. It is unsure whether she was planning to throw a Votes for Women sash around the neck of the king’s horse or deliberately  throw herself under the horse. A 2013 investigation concluded that she intended to gain publicity for her cause by attaching the sash.

Lilian Bland

Lilian was the first woman in the world to design, build and fly an aircraft. Her love of aircrafts started when she received a postcard from her uncle, of a Bleriot monoplane from Paris. She rolled up her sleeves and built her own aircraft, overcoming technical challenges and created Mayfly.

Her family were concerned about her unsafe career which was deemed unseemly for a woman and her father persuaded her to give up the Mayfly in exchange for buying her a car. By April 1911 she was running a car dealership in Belfast.

Lilian Bland

Lilian Bland

Lilian was unconventional for Edwardian society, wearing beeches and smoking cigarettes. A remarkable individual who was also a sports journalist, photographer, expert markswoman and martial arts practitioner.

 

What do you think?  Do you agree that these women had an impact on British women’s rights?  Have I missed out any other late 19th Century women?

Keep an eye out for the next list of which are this time notable men from the 19th century who championed women’s rights.

If you want to find out more about the project just follow #MagnaCartaWomen on Twitter and Facebook or pop onto my Pinterest board #MagnaCartaWomen. http://www.pinterest.com/tracysatchwill/magnacartawomen/

Also to view my portfolio visit www.tracysatchwill.com orwww.bluewaveillustrations.com

 

Magna Carta Women from late 19th century part 2

Magna Carta Women

Magna Carta Women

Here are some more remarkable women who are starring in the Magna Carta Women collage to commemorate 800 years of democracy and illustrate the history of women’s rights.

It’s been difficult deciding who makes it to the list. So far we have looked at some of the key women from the medieval times, 16th, 17th and 18th century including Julian of Norwich, Margery Kempe, the ladies of Llangollen and Mary Astell. This time we look at quite a number of notable women from the 19th century.

Nancy  Astor

After the fearless campaigning for women’s suffrage eventually in 1919 an American-born English socialite sat as the first female Member of Parliament. Nancy Astor became an MP after her husband succeeded to the House of Lords and his seat became free. Nancy decided to contest the vacant Parliamentary seat and

Nancy Astor

Nancy Astor

succeeded.  Unfortunately Nancy wasn’t connected to the slog of the British women’s suffrage movement and was criticised as an upper class woman deemed as ‘out of touch’.
Nevertheless, during her parliamentary career, Nancy devoted herself to the causes of women and children.

Marie  Stopes

A topic that was widely discussed in the early 20th century and would affect women’s rights was birth control. Previously contraception was condemned on religious and moral grounds

Marie Stopes

Marie Stopes

however Victorian social reformers were beginning to advocate a smaller family size. It was not until 1921 when Dr Marie Stopes, a pioneer in the field of birth control, opened the first family planning clinic in London.

Marie was a campaigner for women’s rights and wanted to offer a free service to married women.  She played a major part in removing taboos about sex, which began to improve people’s knowledge about contraception and reproductive health.

Helena  Normanton

The first woman to practice as a barrister in England and the second to be called to the Bar of England and Wales. Helena always wanted to become  a barrister from a young age. She applied to become a student at Middle Temple in 1918 but was refused because she was a woman. However this didn’t stop her and she lodged a petition with the

Helena Normanton

Helena Normanton

House of Lords  and reapplied the following year within hours of the Sex Disqualification Act coming into force and this time was successfully admitted. She was also the first woman to be issued a passport in her maiden name. Helena was a campaigner for women’s rights and women’s suffrage and involved in many organisations such as the Women’s Freedom League and Married Women’s Association. She also kept her maiden name and deplored the loss of a woman’s identity on marriage.

Caroline Haslett

Another woman who was concerned about the welfare of women at home was electrical engineer, Caroline Haslett.  She believed electricity would change women’s lives for the better, offering new opportunities for women by freeing them from time-consuming household chores, which she described as “soul-destroying

Caroline Haslett

Caroline Haslett

drudgery”.  She wanted women to understand science, feel at ease with technology and welcome machines in the household.

As a pioneer for women in the electrical and professional world, Caroline was widely recognised for her work and at 36 years old was awarded a CBE for her services to women and later became a Dame.

What do you think?  Do you agree that these women had an impact on women’s causes?  Have I missed out any other early 19th century women?

Keep an eye out for the next list of which are this time notable men from the 19th century who championed women’s rights.

If you want to find out more about the project just follow #MagnaCartaWomen on Twitter and Facebook or pop onto my Pinterest board #MagnaCartaWomen. http://www.pinterest.com/tracysatchwill/magnacartawomen/

Also to view my portfolio visit www.tracysatchwill.com orwww.bluewaveillustrations.com

Magna Carta Women of today

Magna Carta Women

Magna Carta Women

Here are some remarkable women of today who star in  Magna Carta Women collage, which commemorates 800 years of democracy and illustrates the history of women’s rights.

It was difficult choosing 47 women and 3 men over the last 800 years that would be included in the collage. I wanted to ensure there was a good spread from each century and include women of today who have made giant or even small steps for women’s causes.

Ann Oakley b 1944

This is a personal addition to the list, as Ann was first known to me when I studied ‘A’ Level  Sociology many moons ago and her work struck a cord with me, opening my eyes to the world of feminism.

Ann Oakley

Ann Oakley

In my collage
Sociologist Ann Oakley holds one of her works House Wife, which looks at the plight of women in the family unit as wife, mother and housekeeper. The role of the woman in the home is still discussed today such as on Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour, which recently conducted a  survey called Chore Wars which looked at out how equal is the household.  Ann has written numerous academic works, many focusing on the lives and roles of women in society including women’s transition to motherhood and feminism. Her books have included Who’s afraid of Feminism? and What is feminism?

In 2011 Ann Oakley received one of the first Lifetime Achievement Awards from the British Sociological Association for her ‘extraordinary contribution to the history of the development of sociology in Britain’.  She is currently a Professor at the University of London and also continues writing.

Angela McRobbie b 1951

Angela is a Professor of Communications at Goldsmiths College, University of London. Her work looks at popular culture, contemporary media practices and feminism and has authored many books and articles on young women and popular culture, gender and

Angela McRobbie

Angela McRobbie

sexuality as well as looking at the British fashion industry and the changing world of work. In my collage Angela holds Jackie, a teen magazine, which was part of one of Angela’s study on the relationship of teenage girls and magazines. Angela hasn’t denounced women’s magazines outright like other feminist may have, but points out that many messages are positive and empowering to young women. Other areas Angela has studied includes pop music, dance, modern art and fashion.

Heidi Mirza b 1958

Professor Heidi Mirza focuses on gender, race and culture and in my collage holds her works Black British Feminism, which looks at the belief that sexism, class oppression and racism are all connected and that feminism isn’t just for white women. Professor Mirza has

Heidi Mirza

Heidi Mirza

published extensively on race, gender, Black British feminisms, multiculturalism and educational inequalities. She has also established the Runnymede Collection at the Black Cultural Archives, which is a race-relations archive documenting the late 20th Century civil rights struggle for Multicultural Britain. She is currently a Professor of Race, Faith and Culture at Goldsmiths University of London. She has also been supportive of the Magna Carta Women project commenting on it as ‘Inspirational art that packs a feminist punch’.

Natasha Walter b 1967

Natasha Walter is a writer and human rights activist. In my collage she holds a doll which symbolises one of her books Living Dolls: The Return of Sexism which looks at sexism and femininity in the modern

Natasha Walter

Natasha Walter

world. Walter says, “I once believed that we only had to put in place the conditions for equality for the remnants of old-fashioned sexism in our culture to wither away. I am ready to admit that I was wrong.” She is also the founder and director of the charity Women for Refugee Women which campaigns for the rights of women who seek asylum and writes for The Guardian.

 

Laura Bates b 1986

My collage ends with Laura Bates who is the founder of the Everyday Sexism Project. This is a collection of women’s daily experiences of gender inequality recorded online. Some are minor, some serious however shows that sexism still exists and faced by women today.

Laura Bates

Laura Bates

Laura has also published a book which includes the sexism cases
and writes for
The Guardian
highlighting women’s experiences of sexism.

The collage is of 50 women and men who have contributed to women’s rights but many will follow that will look at today’s issues such as sex slavery, child brides, equal pay and domestic abuse to name just a few.

What do you think?  Do you agree that these women have had an impact on women’s causes?  Do you think I have missed any important women from my collage over the last 800 years?

If you want to find out more about the project just follow #MagnaCartaWomen on Twitter and Facebook or pop onto my Pinterest board #MagnaCartaWomen. http://www.pinterest.com/tracysatchwill/magnacartawomen/

Also to view my portfolio visit www.tracysatchwill.com orwww.bluewaveillustrations.com